Books I read in April 2021

Klara and the sun by Kazuo Ishiguro (new read, physical book)

‘From her place in the store, Klara, an Artificial Friend with outstanding observational qualities, watches carefully the behaviour of those who come in to browse, and of those who pass in the street outside. She remains hopeful a customer will soon choose her, but when the possibility emerges that her circumstances may change for ever, Klara is warned not to invest too much in the promises of humans.’ (Klara and the Sun synopsis)

I was excited to hear that this what coming out as I loved Never Let Me Go and hope to read more of Ishiguro’s books. I love that Ishiguro’s writing is almost plain and simplistic but very compelling too, it was really refreshing to have such an easy literary fiction experience, especially after the brain frazzling world of Murakami. It was so interesting to have Klara as a narrator and see the world from her perspective, as it creates elements of mystery for the reader and made me curious and eager to learn more. Klara’s relationship with the Manager and the Sun were really interesting as they almost take the form of a mother and a relationship with a God. As with Never Let Me Go, something in the writing style stopped the book for being as emotive for me as lots of people find them, but that hasn’t stopped his books from being favourites. I like feeling almost distance whilst still being engaged as this doesn’t often happen, and I think this leaves me more space to really reflect on the philosophy and the questions posed. I also loved how quick this book was to read and feel like I get the most from his books when I read them in just one or two go’s.  I’d definitely recommend this and Never Let Me Go, but please try to learn as little as possible about them before reading! 😊

The Other Bennet Sister by Janice Hadlow (new read, audiobook)

‘The Other Bennet Sister shows another side to Mary. An introvert in a family of extroverts; a constant disappointment to her mother who values beauty above all else; fearful of her father’s sharp tongue; with little in common with her siblings – is it any wonder she turns to books for both company and guidance? And, if she finds her life lonely or lacking, that she determines to try harder at the one thing she can be: right.’ (The Other Bennet Sister synopsis)

I really liked the idea of this book, and the writing was amazing; at no point did it feel like fan-fiction or take you out of the world, it honestly felt like a companion to Pride and Prejudice. I enjoyed learning more about Mary and reading about her perspective, however, at times the extent of her self-deprecation and melancholy made this feel like quite a long book to get through. I understand that this was necessary, as Mary has experienced so much neglect and emotional abuse throughout her life. This is not to say that I didn’t enjoy this book, I just felt that it was too long for me to feel that I loved it. Also, I just reread Pride and Prejudice at the end of last year, and due to the amazing writing style, this felt so similar that it was maybe too soon for me to listen to this book and get the most from it. I did find that I was more invested and interested in the later chapters, which I listened to over a couple of days. I always feel this way about audiobooks; listening to them frequently and quickly usually means I enjoy the book more, and for this reason I don’t really feel like my opinions are always truly reflective. Overall, I found this interesting and really enjoyed being back in this world, reading about a character who really didn’t get enough time or credit in Pride and Prejudice. I would recommend this, although I did feel it to be a little long at times.

Percy Jackson and the Last Olympian by Rick Riordan (new read, physical book)

‘Normally when you turn sixteen you get a really cool present. But, being sixteen and the son of Poseidon can never be that simple. So instead, I get a prophecy that says the fate of the entire world on my shoulders. Great. On top of that, Kronos, Lord of the Titans, is attacking New York City and the dreaded monster Typhon is heading our way. So, it’s me and forty of my demi-god friends versus untold evil. Happy birthday to me!’ (The Last Olympian synopsis)

Somehow, after reading (and loving) the series for the first time last year I managed to forget to read the last one hahaha. I didn’t remember too much before going into this, but for once that meant I was thankful for the middle grade trait of constantly recounting the previous books in the first chapter. I love this series, the characters are funny, kindhearted and a bit chaotic, the plot is always interesting (although I’m too lazy for fight scenes haha so I’d genuinely just prefer a book of them all dancing about camp half blood) and the myths are woven in so well for children, interesting enough that it never feels like a school lesson. I know that Percy has dyslexia and ADHD, which is something Riordan has written for children to relate to. I was thinking about this while reading, and I’ve noticed that these books and constantly full of twists, turns and actions; I think this was done purposefully to engage children with ADHD who would maybe otherwise find reading to be a chore. I think this was such a clever idea! I think this series is particularly good as I often find middle grade boring, but I was interested throughout despite reading these aged 24/25. 😊 Having read Harry Potter countless times throughout childhood, I definitely feel a stronger connection to those books (although I’m having trouble with she who must not be named), but I think Percy Jackson is such a good engaging and exciting series for children. 😊

Grown Ups by Marian Keyes (new read, physical book)

‘Married to brothers Johnny, Ed and Liam Casey. Three very different women tied to three very different men. Every family occasion is a party – until the day the secrets spill out.’ (Grown Ups synopsis)

I don’t know if every country has an Asda, but it’s always one of my favourite places to buy books, they have such good deals on and I come out with incredibly random selections of funny warm hearted books. I enjoyed this book as it was really easy to read and I liked the characters who were written too be liked as well as disliking those who weren’t. I would love to learn more about Ireland and visit it, and I enjoyed the Irish words and humour throughout (some is very similar to Glaswegian!). However, at times this book felt a bit long (I feel like I’m saying this about lots of things recently, maybe it’s just my pandemic mindset haha). I also think it’s really important to mention that this is advertised as funny and light-hearted; quite a significant plot point follows a character suffering from an eating disorder, which I really didn’t realise going into it. Family members close to me have dealt with eating disorders and I find it really difficult to read about them. I think it’s therefore important that books advertised in such a way acknowledge the triggers as I felt very upset and a bit overwhelmed whilst reading. Saying that, I acknowledge that I read lots of books with dark themes, many of which others may find triggering, and my emotions whilst reading this book probably wouldn’t be felt as strongly by some others. It’s just something I’ve been thinking about in the marketing of books. Anyway, this is otherwise quite funny and an easy read, so I’d recommend it for anyone who enjoys family themes.

A Kind of Spark by Elle McNicoll (new read, physical book)

‘A Kind of Spark tells the story of 11-year-old Addie as she campaigns for a memorial in memory of the witch trials that took place in her Scottish hometown. Addie knows there’s more to the story of these ‘witches’, just like there is more to hers. Can Addie challenge how the people in her town see her, and her autism, and make her voice heard?’ (A Kind of Spark synopsis)

As I said above, I sadly don’t really enjoy middle grade or children’s books unless I read them as a child. I can find these books quite boring at times. For this reason, I like to focus on how I feel the intended reader may find these books instead. I bought this book to read to my classes in the future and to pass on to children who enjoy reading, and this book was chosen for a number of reasons- the narrator is an autistic female and is this book is very importantly written by a neurodivergent author. Very little is known about autism in girls and the ways in can present in some individuals due to a lack of research and girls tendency to be very good at masking. I therefore think this book is so important in reading diverse voices, especially for children. The plot is interesting and touching, and I’m excited to have lots of conversations with my older classes regarding the themes of this book. I should also say I’m always more intrigued to buy anything Scottish, I am pretty biased haha! I’d definitely recommend this book for children, and adults who enjoy middle grade. 😊

Thank you for reading, I hope you’re well! 🙂 Please let me know what you’ve been reading. Also, please recommend anyone who writes like Ishiguro, I love his writing 🙂

Books I read in March 2021

The Wind-up Bird Chronicle by Murakami (physical book, new read)

‘His wife is growing more distant every day. Then there are the increasingly explicit telephone calls he has recently been receiving.

As this compelling story unfolds, the tidy suburban realities of Okada’s vague and blameless life, spent cooking, reading, listening to jazz and opera and drinking beer at the kitchen table, are turned inside out, and he embarks on a bizarre journey, guided (however obscurely) by a succession of characters, each with a tale to tell.’
(The Wind-up Bird Chronicle synopsis)

I should start this by saying- this book is incredibly, incredibly weird. I think I got off lightly with Norwegian Wood as my first Murakami, I am now delving into the surreal world of confusion. The writing style is immaculate as usual, detailed, interesting, and unusual, and I loved some of the themes. These themes and style linked this book in a way that makes me feel that all of Murakami’s books and characters are likely set in the same world and could easily interlink with one another (I find this interesting rather than off-putting). However, I didn’t enjoy it as much as Norwegian Wood. Initially, the morality of the narrator struck me. He is an incredibly passive character and therefore very morally grey, overlooking some significantly disturbing stories (again, please search trigger warnings before reading any Murakami books). I think my main personal issue whilst reading this was that I often experience the emotions or themes of a story, and this one really made me feel quite low at times- this is testament to the writing style but not ideal during a lockdown hahaha. This was particularly evident after one chapter where we learn of a soldier’s story- I’m genuinely still scarred, if you’ve read it you know what I mean. I found the themes and the ending interesting, and as always, I enjoyed the mythology parallels to be seen, particularly Orpheus. I was intrigued by this book and very interested, although it was a bit long and spiralled me on a bit of a downer hahaha so I definitely preferred the less surreal roots of Norwegian Wood. I will continue to read his books eventually though (when I’m less scarred).

Exciting Times by Naoise Dolan (audiobook, new read)

‘When you leave Ireland aged 22 to spend your parents’ money, it’s called a gap year. When Ava leaves Ireland aged 22 to make her own money, she’s not sure what to call it, but it involves:
a badly-paid job in Hong Kong, teaching English grammar to rich children; Julian, who likes to spend money on Ava and lets her move into his guest room; Edith, who Ava meets while Julian is out of town and actually listens to her when she talks; money, love, cynicism, unspoken feelings and unlikely connections. Exciting times ensue.’
(Exciting times synopsis)

I think this would definitely be classed as ‘millennial fiction’ and I really liked it! I always love listening to audiobooks by Irish authors as it’s honestly my favourite accent haha. The themes are some which have been covered many many times in this genre but I still found them interesting; class, identity and sexuality were the main themes. I’m always looking for more contemporary LGBT/lesbian books so please let me know of any! I enjoyed the exploration of these themes and found the narrator likeable (although she did do things that drove me insane, but these were part of her character so I lived to accept them). If you like these themes/this genre I’d recommend. 😊

A series of Unfortunate Events 10-13 by Lemony Snicket (physical books, rereads)

Once again, I’ve finished my reread of this series haha- this was especially necessary in getting some of the darker elements of the wind-up bird chronicle out of my mind! In these blog posts, I haven’t really mentioned too much about these books, but I would like to mention ‘The End’ in a bit more detail. I love a book series that develops in maturity with the reader, and the themes of morality change from black and white villains, to everyone is grey with a few existential breakdowns as the characters age, which I loved. Morality and family are central themes in these books, with loss of innocence. I love the way that this series explores the sense that being an adult does not mean being ‘good’ or right, and that children are capable and worthy of respect- beings rather than becoming’s. These themes reminded me of Roald Dahls books, he also did this so well. Rereading as an ‘adult’ the later, more detailed books are definitely more interesting, as the elements of mystery and morality come into play. ‘The End’ is a very philosophical book with strong ties to the garden of Eden/Adam Eve and the Snake whilst exploring the concept of innocence (there is a literal tree of knowledge, I honestly love religious parallels). There are also Animal Farm corrupt communism vibes going on, and I feel like Snicket/Handler is also influenced by dystopias like Lord of the Flies, although I haven’t read that and can’t be sure.

These books are flawed and a bit pretentious as I’ve previously mentioned, but I still feel a love for the nostalgia and comfort that they bring me. Ps. I also watched the Netflix series, and I’d recommend, they’ve done it so well! (I’m always pretty late to tv shows hahaha).

Heartburn by Nora Ephron (audiobook, new read)

‘Seven months into her pregnancy, Rachel discovers that her husband is in love with another woman. The fact that this woman has a ‘neck as long as an arm and a nose as long as a thumb’ is no consolation. Food sometimes is, though, since Rachel is a cookery writer, and between trying to win Mark back and wishing him dead, she offers us some of her favourite recipes. HEARTBURN is a roller coaster of love, betrayal, loss and – most satisfyingly – revenge.’ (Heartburn synopsis)

I had to idea what this was about after randomly finding the audiobook- the main factors that drew me in were how short it was (I’ve been trying to motivate myself to go on more walks), and Meryl Streep as narrator. Only after finishing did I realise it’s based on Ephron’s own life, and she was a famous author (oops). This book is based on quite dark humour, with themes of the infidelity and anti-Semitism experienced by the main character. The book kind of read to me like a one-woman comedy show (although all I know about them is Chandler’s experience in friends with ‘why don’t you like me’, chapter one my first period hahaha). Sometimes I felt that the humour was controversial, and although sexuality wasn’t a main theme I noticed that comments on sexuality were borderline homophobic, so for this reason I wouldn’t recommend.

Overall this was a strange strange mix of books haha, I loved rereading a Series of Unfortunate Events and really enjoyed Exciting Times. Happy Easter, I hope you’ve read some good books recently! Please recommend me some books, particularly LGBT 🙂

May books 22nd to 31st

Queenie- Candice Carty-Williams (physical book, new read)

Meet Queenie. She just can’t cut a break. Well, apart from one from her long term boyfriend, Tom. That’s just a break though. Definitely not a break up. Stuck between a boss who doesn’t seem to see her, a family who don’t seem to listen (if it’s not Jesus or water rates, they’re not interested), and trying to fit in two worlds that don’t really understand her, it’s no wonder she’s struggling.’ (Queenie synopsis)

Whilst I read this book before the murder of George Floyd and the protests, I would again like to address the horrific events and systemic racism that black people are experiencing, specific police brutality and everyday racism at the hands of ignorant white people. I am continuing to educate myself, sign petitions and donate to causes that support Black lives matter, and I will continue to read- and actively seek out books- written by black authors or representing the experiences of black people to enhance my education as I aim to become actively anti-racist. I understand that I will never understand. However, I stand.

I knew nothing about this book going into it, but I instantly loved Queenie as a character and found this very quick and easy to read. This book emphasises the more ‘every-day’ elements of systemic racism and Candy-Williams highlighted the ignorance of white people in denying racism through the dismissive nature of the white characters; Queenie experiences lots of gaslighting from her relationship and there are several examples of her ex-boyfriend supporting the racist statements and assumptions made by his family. As a result of this gaslighting, Queenie often doubts herself and the racism or sexism that she faces throughout this book- I loved the nuanced way that this is addressed as the writer effectively emphasised the doubt that people can feel whilst standing up for what’s right, and the way that dominant assumptions and meritocratic discourse create an environment where racism and sexism can go unchallenged. Queenie will be a very relatable character for readers in her actions and inner monologues. I will note here that there is lots on consent, power and abuse which is extremely well written but may act as a trigger for some readers.

I also enjoyed the realistic and positive depictions of mental health and illness, and Queenies relationships with her family and friends. Themes of reliance on others and the need to work on yourself and learn to love yourself can be seen throughout. It was very interesting to read about the cultural elements of mental health discussions in this book; Queenie and her family reflect upon the often-dismissive reaction to mental illness within Jamaican culture, and reluctance or shame surrounding accepting help.

Important/meaningful quote:

It’s not putting black lives on a pedestal, I don’t even know what that means,” I said, my heart beating fast. “It’s saying that black lives, at this point, and historically, do not, and have not mattered, and that they should!”
I looked first at Gina, then around the room to see if anyone was going to back me up. Instead, I was met with what I’d been trying to pretend hadn’t always been a room full of white not-quite-liberals whose opinions, like their money, had been inherited.”

The Hate U Give- Angie Thomas (audiobook, new read)

Sixteen-year-old Starr lives in two worlds: the poor neighbourhood where she was born and raised and her posh high school in the suburbs. The uneasy balance between them is shattered when Starr is the only witness to the fatal shooting of her unarmed best friend, Khalil, by a police officer. Now what Starr says could destroy her community. It could also get her killed. Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, this is a powerful and gripping novel about one girl’s struggle for justice.’ (The Hate U Give synopsis)

I watched this film when it came out and I was incredibly moved but having never read the book I decided to listen to it. This book is extremely powerful and is still incredibly relevant, the events of this story are exactly parallel within the police brutality, protests, and social media conversations we are having today. The fact that this story was relevant and continues to be relevant is despicable. Starr is an amazing and relatable character and I would recommend that everybody read this story, regardless of age. I’ve been thinking about books that I can read with my class to learn about race and racism, and whilst The Hate U Give is too mature for primary school I highly recommend giving this book to any teenagers and young adults, it is incredible. I would also recommend watching the film, it has been adapted very well and is incredibly powerful.

Important/meaningful quote:

That’s the problem. We let people say stuff, and they say it so much that it becomes okay to them and normal for us. What’s the point of having a voice if you’re gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn’t be?”

People like us in situations like this become hashtags, but they rarely get justice. I think we all wait for that one time though, that one time when it ends right.

My Year of Rest and Relaxation- Ottessa Moshfegh (physical book, new read)

It’s the year 2000 in a city aglitter with wealth and possibility; what could be so terribly wrong? Our narrator has many of the advantages of life: Young, thin, pretty, a recent Columbia graduate, she lives in an apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan paid for, like everything else, by her inheritance. But there is a vacuum at the heart of things, and it isn’t just the loss of her parents in college, or the way her Wall Street boyfriend treats her, or her sadomasochistic relationship with her alleged best friend.’ (My Year of Rest and Relaxation synopsis)

This book is a little bit mental hahaha, I’m intrigued to read some of Moshfegh’s other books to see if they have similar surreal plots and characters. Whilst this book touches on elements of grief and depression it is a satirical account of wealth, youth and the sense of dissatisfaction or ingratitude that can come with privilege. I think this is also written as though it is a social commentary of those who perceive ‘Generation z’ to be lazy, entitled, and uninspired due to the perceived ease of life today. The main character is unlikable and Moshfegh writes her sense of entitlement and selfish nature in a very interesting insightful way. This book has a particularly unsettling contrast when read alongside the other books I read this week, with themes of privilege, prejudice, and discrimination. The tone of this book is in parts gloomy and funny and I found it very interesting to read about the caricatures of realistic people (if that makes any sense at all).

Whilst reading, I also noted that the main character has a similar vibe to the narrator of American Psycho and these books gave me a similar sort of feeling (I liked this one more though, American Psycho made me feel a bit queasy most of the time). I was also reminded of The Vegetarian in the last half of the book, the characters ‘transformations’ felt similar.

Important/meaningful quote:

‘in my frenzied state of despair, I understood: there was stability in living in the past.

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes

I made an entire blog post about this book (basically a rant hahaha, it was not my favourite).

Thank you for reading and I hope you’re all doing okay. Please consider writing to your MP/MSP if you live in the UK, signing petitions, donating if you can and educating yourself to become actively anti-racist.

https://www.change.org/p/mayor-jacob-frey-justice-for-george-floyd

https://www.blackvisionsmn.org/

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/CharitableArtByCarly

Weekly books (May 8th to May 14th)

A bit of a Stretch: The Diaries of a Prisoner- Chris Atkins (new read, audiobook)

Where can a tin of tuna buy you clean clothes? Where is it easier to get ‘spice’ than paracetamol? Where does self-harm barely raise an eyebrow?

Welcome to Her Majesty’s Prison Service. Like most people, documentary-maker Chris Atkins didn’t spend much time thinking about prisons. But after becoming embroiled in a dodgy scheme to fund his latest film, he was sent down for five years. His new home would be HMP Wandsworth, one of the largest and most dysfunctional prisons in Europe. With a cast of characters ranging from wily drug dealers to senior officials bent on endless reform, this powerful memoir uncovers the horrifying reality behind the locked gates. Filled with dark humour and shocking stories, A Bit of a Stretch reveals why our creaking prison system is sorely costing us all – and why you should care
.’ (A Bit of a Stretch synopsis)

I don’t read very much non-fiction (I need to read more), but memoirs are my favourite genre to read via audiobook, I think they work really well and can be brought to life- particularly because they’re usually narrated by the author. I particularly seem to enjoy memoirs about institutions such as hospitals and prison (I’d recommend This is Going to Hurt, and the Confessions series). I enjoyed this book, felt for the people and I think it has a great balance of humour. I really felt enveloped in the setting and the stories were told in a way that brought the individuals and setting to life. I wouldn’t say this is my favourite prison memoir, and I probably enjoyed Orange is the New Black more (I will say here, Orange is the New Black is one of the rare tv shows that is better than the book, they have done so much with the characters and I can’t recommend it highly enough). Throughout this book, I thought about the crime committed by Atkins and his place in prison- as a white male who has not experienced mental illness, poverty or trauma, the writer’s prison experience is not reflective of the majority. However, I was extremely happy when Atkins acknowledged this himself and reflected upon the privilege that he experienced even within prison; this awareness made the memoir and narrator more likeable. Atkins also used the memoir to emphasise some of the struggles of other men within the prison and used his time to become a better person, as well as highlighting the issues within the prison system. I personally agree that prison is not working, people are dehumanised and there should be far more done to support those with mental health issues and rehabilitate. Overall, this was an enjoyable insightful book and I would really recommend it if you like this genre! 😊 Please let me know if you’ve read any memoirs about the prison system, I find them so interesting.

Favourite/meaningful quote:

I always forget to note quotes for audiobooks haha but there were lots!

Perfect- Cecelia Ahern (new read, physical book)

Celestine North lives in a society that demands perfection. After she was branded Flawed by a morality court, Celestine’s life has completely fractured – all her freedoms gone. Since Judge Crevan has declared her the number one threat to the public, she has been a ghost, on the run with the complicated, powerfully attractive Carrick, the only person she can trust. But Celestine has a secret – one that could bring the entire Flawed system crumbling to the ground.

Judge Crevan is gaining the upper hand, and time is running out for Celestine. With tensions building, Celestine must make a choice: save only herself, or risk her life to save all the Flawed. And, most important of all, can she prove that to be human in itself is to be Flawed…?’ (Perfect synopsis)

I enjoyed the first book in this series (Flawed), however, I didn’t really like this book, I mainly kept reading because I have an annoying irrational need to finish books haha, and my friend gave me it to borrow. I don’t really like love triangles, and whilst this wasn’t as bad as some it did still annoy me a little bit. I thought the pace was a little bit strange sometimes and a little rushed at the end, however, there were strong parts and I’m glad the Ahern decided to go with two books instead of the typical trilogy as I don’t feel that another book would have been necessary. I have to admit I’m struggling to remember too much about this book, but I wrote a couple of tiny notes: at times I felt that there were instant connections between Celestine and new characters who were introduced. This is a heightened, dystopian world; however, these relationships didn’t feel very realistic. This book still has elements of the Hunger Games and more of Divergent. There were also some unsettling parallels to concentration camps within the book. Overall, despite whingeing about this book I did enjoy the idea of a dystopian story based on ethics and moral dilemmas, and I think the message of anti-discrimination is amazing, I just personally didn’t like elements of the writing style. You may like this book if you enjoy Divergent or if you’ve read Flawed in the past. 😊

Important/meaningful quote:

Maybe the strongest fighters are the nurturers because they’re connected to something deep in their core, they’ve got something to fight for, they’ve got something worth saving.’

The Hunger Games- Suzanne Collins (reread, physical book) and Catching Fire- Suzanne Collins (reread, physical book)

I’m writing a separate blog post for my hunger games reread when I finish Mockingjay, this is one of my absolute favourite series.

Thank you for reading, please recommend non-fiction, I’d like to read more of it! Also, memoirs and books set in institutions. 😊

Books I read in March

Wolf Hall – Hilary Mantel (physical book, new read)

England, the 1520s. Henry VIII is on the throne, but has no heir. Cardinal Wolsey is his chief advisor, charged with securing the divorce the pope refuses to grant. Into this atmosphere of distrust and need comes Thomas Cromwell, first as Wolsey’s clerk, and later his successor.

Cromwell is a wholly original man: the son of a brutal blacksmith, a political genius, a briber, a charmer, a bully, a man with a delicate and deadly expertise in manipulating people and events. Ruthless in pursuit of his own interests, he is as ambitious in his wider politics as he is for himself. His reforming agenda is carried out in the grip of a self-interested parliament and a king who fluctuates between romantic passions and murderous rages.

From one of our finest living writers, Wolf Hall is that very rare thing: a truly great English novel, one that explores the intersection of individual psychology and wider politics. With a vast array of characters, and richly overflowing with incident, it peels back history to show us Tudor England as a half-made society, moulding itself with great passion, suffering and courage.’

In March I began to see this book everywhere, and with an interest in the time period and Tudors I decided to try it- I was panic buying books in Waterstones on my last day out with the idea that lockdown was soon impending. I never purposefully read books based on book prizes such as the man booker, but I watch lots of book videos on youtube and the interesting ones tend to come up a lot until I become curious. I enjoyed this book and the atmosphere, particularly the later sections when Cromwell had more interactions with Anne and Mary, however, it felt too long when I was reading it and at times I lost the thread a little bit. In the past I’ve read about the tudors through the Alison Weir series The Six Tudor Queens and I love these books, but I feel that it would have been beneficial to know more about the time period and Thomas Cromwell before reading this book. This is something I could have researched as I read the book, but as I grew closer to the end I wanted to finish the book. I didn’t feel very connected to Cromwell due to the writing style, and I think I’m more interested in continuing to learn about the six queens. I don’t think I’ll read the rest of the trilogy, but I would definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in the Tudors. P.s I feel like this is a good time to mention that I’m obsessed with a song if ice and fire and always looking at parallels haha, I was interested in the Littlefinger/Cromwell parallels that I noticed 🙂

Favourite/meaningful quote:

I was always desired. But now i am valued. And that is a different thing, i find.’

A Little Life – Hanya Yanagihara (physical book, new read)

I wrote a whole review/rant about this haha so please go there if you’re interested in my rambling.

Lovely War – Julie Berry (physical book, new read)

‘Thirty years after four lovers’ fates collide, the Greek goddess Aphrodite tells their stories to her husband, Hephaestus, and her lover, Ares, in a luxe Manhattan hotel room at the height of World War II. She seeks to answer the age-old question: Why are Love and War eternally drawn to one another? But her quest for a conclusion that will satisfy her jealous husband uncovers a multi-threaded tale of prejudice, trauma, and music and reveals that War is no match for the power of Love.’

I wanted to read this book as soon as I heard about it because I love everything to do with Greek mythology and I was interested in the narration. This book felt lighter and cheesier than I expected it to be- although I didn’t know going into it that it was young adult so that’s maybe why- and I didn’t feel strongly connected to the characters, although I liked the secondary love story more so than the main one. I enjoyed the story and the elements of music throughout, but I don’t think it will stick with me and it wasn’t a favourite. The narration style was very cheesy but interesting, the Gods and Goddesses reminded me a bit of the humorous depictions such as in Good Omens and Supernatural. I’d maybe recommend this for people who enjoy young adult historical fiction, but I prefer othr young adult books when depicting mythology.

Favourite/meaningful quote:

If music stops, and art ceases, and beauty fades, what have we then?

Norse Mythology – Neil Gaiman (physical book, new read)

Neil Gaiman has long been inspired by ancient mythology in creating the fantastical realms of his fiction. Now he turns his attention back to the source, presenting a bravura rendition of the great northern tales. In Norse Mythology, Gaiman fashions primeval stories into a novelistic arc that begins with the genesis of the legendary nine worlds; delves into the exploits of the deities, dwarves, and giants; and culminates in Ragnarok, the twilight of the gods and the rebirth of a new time and people. Gaiman stays true to the myths while vividly reincarnating Odin, the highest of the high, wise, daring, and cunning; Thor, Odin’s son, incredibly strong yet not the wisest of gods; and Loki, the son of giants, a trickster and unsurpassable manipulator. From Gaiman’s deft and witty prose emerges the gods with their fiercely competitive natures, their susceptibility to being duped and to dupe others, and their tendency to let passion ignite their actions, making these long-ago myths breathe pungent life again.’

This is the first book I’ve read about Norse mythology and I really enjoyed it! This was a good book to start with as it was very easy to read and although I don’t typically like short stories I found the characters and stories interesting- although I need to get used to the names as I doubt I can pronounce any. Being Scottish, I enjoyed learning about Norse mythology as it is probably the mythology most closely related to Scotland- I know they are fictional myths hahaha, I’m very bad at explaining what I mean- and I enjoyed reading about the gruelling hardships faced by the Gods that are very different to Greek and Roman mythology (although Greek is still my favourite). I’m not intrigued to read more about Norse mythology so if you have any recommendations please let me know! 🙂 In terms of ASOIAF parallels, I love the elements of Odin/Ragnarok/symbolism/prophecy that GRRM has been influenced by when writing about the wall/Bran/the three eyed raven/Jon. I’m definitely going to read more about the parallels and influence, these are the things I do at 2am.

Favourite/meaningful quote:

‘The Norse myths are the myths of a chilly place, with long, long winter nights and endless summer days, myths of a people who did not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them.’

A spot of bother – Mark Haddon (physical book/new read)

At fifty-seven, George is settling down to a comfortable retirement, building a shed in his garden, reading historical novels, listening to a bit of light jazz. Then Katie, his tempestuous daughter, announces that she is getting remarried, to Ray.

The family is not pleased, as her brother Jamie observes, Ray has ‘strangler’s hands’. Katie can’t decide if she loves Ray, or loves the way he cares for her son Jacob, and her mother Jean is a bit put out by the way the wedding planning gets in the way of her affair with one of her husband’s former colleagues. And the tidy and pleasant life Jamie has created crumbles when he fails to invite his lover, Tony, to the dreaded nuptials.

Unnoticed in the uproar, George discovers a sinister lesion on his hip, and quietly begins to lose his mind.

I’m still addicted to buying new books but for the most part I am reading a very random collection of books with the aim of no longer owning at least 50 unread books. I read this book with no real expectations as I knew little about the plot and vaguely remember buying it from a charity shop a long time ago. I really enjoyed this book! I love black humour and sarcasm, and the spiralling turn of events that make the world seem a little bit like an apocalypse really relate to the current state of the world (I will say here, I am taking what’s happening very seriously and understand the severity and tragedy behind it, but on things like social media I try to keep things as normal and light at possible because I think a little bit of humour and joy is helping everyone). I really liked the main character in the story and enjoyed the spiralling of events and pace of the book. I’d recommend if you enjoy sarcastic humour and stories about family 🙂

Favourite/meaningful quote:

The secret of contentment lay in ignoring many things completely.’

The Wouldbegoods – E. Nesbit (audiobook, new read)

‘Sent away to the country after a particularly unruly episode, the well-meaning but wayward Bastable children solemnly vow to reform their behavior. But their grand schemes for great and virtuous deeds lead to just as much mayhem as their ordinary games, and sometimes more.’

I decided to listen to this audiobook in my quest to read the books I’ve owned for a, long long time. I didn’t have a great interest in this book and it hasn’t really stuck with me. I also found some parts to be stereotypical or sexist, I think maybe because this book was written in 1899. I wouldn’t recommend this to children for these reasons, however, I’ll always keep this book and appreciate it due to the sentimental value of being given it by my dad as a wee girl.

When God was a Rabbit – Sarah Winman (audiobook, new read)

When God Was a Rabbit is the story of a memorable young heroine, Elly, and her loss of innocence; a magical portrait of the pull and power of family ties, of loss and life. From Essex and Cornwall to the streets of New York, from 1968 to the events of 9/11, When God Was a Rabbit follows the evolving bond of love and secrets between Elly and her brother, Joe, and her increasing concern for her best friend, Jenny Penny, who has secrets of her own. Funny, quirky, utterly compelling, and poignant, too, When God Was a Rabbit heralds the start of a remarkable new literary career.

Another book I found at a charity shop a good few years ago, I enjoyed this book and the flow of it and I liked learning more about the characters lives over time, however, this was another book I didn’t really connect with or care deeply about. I like to get extremely invested in a story and it’s characters (I think this is why I love long, character driven stories) so it can feel a bit sad when this doesn’t happen. I will say though, I don’t know if this was due to reading this at a time when I wasn’t really in the mood for it, or listening to the audiobook instead of reading it. I’m not normally so fussy with books but March seemed to be a month where I didn’t find anything I really loved, and maybe this is why I’m often drawn to rereading old books instead of reading new ones. I think this is also because I’ve been trying to read a lot of the books I own already, so I bought them long ago.

Favourite/meaningful quote:

Memories no matter how small or inconsequential are the pages that define us.’

Our Stop – Laura Jane Williams (audiobook, new read)

Nadia gets the 7.30 train every morning without fail. Well, except if she oversleeps or wakes up at her friend Emma’s after too much wine. Daniel really does get the 7.30 train every morning, which is easy because he hasn’t been able to sleep properly since his dad died.One morning, Nadia’s eye catches sight of a post in the daily paper:

To the cute girl with the coffee stains on her dress. I’m the guy who’s always standing near the doors… Drink sometime?

So begins a not-quite-romance of near-misses, true love, and the power of the written word.

I don’t know why I read romance contemporaries because I always end up moaning that I don’t like cheesy books haha- but I do like to have a nice balance, and funny easy to read cheesy books were DEFINITELY needed after A Little Life. This was particularly cheesy and a lil unrealistic even for the genre but I did enjoy listening to it despite this. There were times where the characters would discuss feminism or gender, but these seemed quote random and I felt a little bit like they were in the book just to add depth when they didn’t really seem to fit in. Not a favourite, but still fun to read. I would recommend Beth O’Leary’s books for this genre 🙂

March Favourite

Norse mythology was probably my favourite book in March 🙂 Thank you anyone who has read to this point, I do ramble haha. Please recommend any books you think I might like and let me know if you’ve read any of these